Archive for September, 2013

New term for book group!

Jackie Kay's hero, Audre Lorde. I love this picture.

Jackie Kay’s hero, Audre Lorde. I love this picture.

Summer is over, the dark nights are rolling in, there’s a, autumnal chill in the air, everyone’s back to work (lots of teachers in the ranks!), soall have a reason to be feeling a bit miserable. Luckily, for September we’d been reading Red Dust Road by Jackie Kay— a rare, joyful gem of a book which, though it didn’t TOTALLY rock everyone’s world, was universally praised for its generosity and big-heartedness. Here’s what we thought:

PROS
*We loved the way a story which could be a “tragic life story”— adoption, racism, dementia— became, in Jackie’s hands, a humane, joyful story of her search for her “roots”. A testament to her own character and her awesome (adoptive) parents that she manages all these events with such grace and lack of anger.
*Her awesome (adoptive) parents who this book is a love letter to and are the absolute stars of Red Dust Road. Their frank Scottish humour, their total love of Jackie and her brother, their honesty, their communism, their strong colourful characters— we wanted a whole book about them!
*It’s really funny.
*Deceptively easy to read, yet also poetic and conjors incredibly vivid pictures.
*Thought provoking exploration of what makes a person “themselves”.

CONS
* Some people found that because they didn’t know who Jackie was before reading the book they found it difficult to care too much about the story. I vehemently disagreed.
*The jumping back and forth in time annoyed the life out of some people and made it difficult to follow.
*A bit underwhelming. Lots of people felt that while they enjoyed the read it wouldn’t “stay with them”.

Mostly the whole book group wants to take Jackie for a drink and a natter.  Also, a special mention for a group member who became a Jackie groupie, researched her life AND read her short stories. Big gold star for you Laura!

Next time, we’re onto something totally different— a novel called How I Killed Margaret Thatcher by Anthony Cartwright. We’re doing it in October because it’s been nominated for the first Gordon Burn Prize, the result of which will be announced at this years Durham Book Festival. You can even come to the prize ceremony too! It’s well worth checking out the rest of the programme too: http://www.durhambookfestival.com/home.html

Enjoy reading and see you next time!

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